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Archive for February, 2015

Keeping warm and cozy

Today was the perfect day to do this:

Cozy cat

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Dr. Miele will be out of the office on Wednesday morning.

Clients who have scheduled afternoon appointments with us
will be notified if the snow forces us to cancel.
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Meantime, play it safe out there. 
This was the scene earlier this evening when the heavy
snowfall obscured the median and caused a
confused motorist to drive into a ditch.
Luckily, several people responded, including a person 
who provided a tow rope and another whose
truck had enough torque to pull the SUV out of the ditch.

This driver ended up in a ditch too steep to drive out of.

This driver ended up in a ditch too steep to drive out of.

A caring motorist stopped and attempted to help push the heavy vehicle out of the ditch, but no luck.

A caring motorist stopped and attempted to help push the heavy vehicle out of the ditch, but no luck.

Traffic conditions made getting this car back on the road a perilous task.

Traffic conditions made getting this car back on the road a perilous task.

A driver in a pickup truck stepped in to assist. A Jeep Wrangler had failed to dislodge the SUV. Would the pickup prove more capable?

A driver in a pickup truck stepped in to assist. A Jeep Wrangler had failed to dislodge the SUV. Would the pickup prove more capable?

This looks promising already!

Yep! That did it! After checking the vehicle was drive-able, the relieved SUV driver was once again on the road.

Yep! That did it! After checking the vehicle was drive-able, the relieved SUV driver was once again on the road.

 

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Pet dental care

It’s never too late to start brushing your pet’s teeth, but persuading Fluffy and Spike to go along with it can be a challenge. Here are 8 great tips to help you ease your pet into a new part of its daily routine:

  1. Introduce a brushing program gradually: training your pet for this procedure may take several days or weeks.
  2. At first, dip your finger into beef bouillon for a dog or tuna water for cats, and rub your finger over the pet’s mouth and teeth.
  3. Make these initial sessions brief and positive.
  4. Introduce gauze on your finger with the same beef or tuna flavor and begin rubbing the teeth in a circular motion.
  5. Before graduating to a soft-bristle toothbrush, put a small amount of pet toothpaste on your finger and allow your pet to taste it.
  6. Place the toothpaste on the toothbrush and allow your pet to lick the bristles.
  7. Apply a small dab of toothpaste to a moist toothbrush and begin brushing gently at a 45° angle away from the gumline.
  8. Do not use a toothpaste designed for people; it contains ingredients that may upset your pet’s stomach.

     February is National Pet  Dental Health Month.
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Tips reprinted from the Pet Owner’s Guide to Oral Care, available at our clinic.

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Originally posted on February 15, 2012.

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Since it’s already the 17th, I should tell you that February is National Pet Dental Health Month.
PetDental_logoPet

No doubt you’ve been furiously brushing your teeth after ingesting all the candy your Sweetie gave you last Saturday.

After you’ve finished taking care of your own choppers, take a look inside your pet’s mouth. 

Choose a dentifrice made for pets.

Choose a dentifrice made for pets.

  • Are any teeth loose, broken, or missing?
  • Are the gums swollen or inflamed?
  • Are there any growths on the gums, lips, roof or floor of the mouth?
  • Do you see pus or blood in the mouth?
  • Are the teeth yellow, brown, or crusted with tartar?
  • Is there a foul odor?
  • Is there fur wrapped around the teeth? (This happens mainly in pets that lick or chew at themselves often.)
  • Has your pet become reluctant to eat, drink cold water, or play with chew toys?
  • Is your pet drooling excessively?
  • Is there a lump beneath one or both eyes (this can signal a carnassial tooth root abscess.)

If you notice any of those signs in your pet, it’s time for a dental checkup.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

Good pet dental health begins at home.  Look for pet-specific toothpaste (human toothpaste is not recommended), gels and liquids meant for cleaning your pet’s mouth after meals.
Regular use of a dentifrice can help delay plaque and tartar buildup and it can help freshen your pet’s breath.  (We like Oxyfresh Oral Hygiene for Pets.)
Cleaning your pet’s teeth after meals will allow you to notice any changes in oral health right away.

Left: a calculus shell    Right: a molar once covered by the calculus shell  (Photo by Jennifer Miele)

Left: a calculus shell Right: a molar once covered by the calculus shell (Photo by Jennifer Miele)

This is the inside of the calculus shell, which was molded to the tooth.  (Photo by Jennifer Miele)

This is the inside of the calculus shell, which was molded to the tooth. (Photo by Jennifer Miele)

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This post originally appeared February 15, 2011.

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We’ve been talking lately about pet poison emergencies. But did you know that in some cases, your pet’s emergency can become a health hazard for you, too?

Your pet can become seriously ill if he ingests a certain type of rodenticide – but now comes word that what your pet eats can have serious consequences for you, too.

As reported in the June 2012 edition of DVM Newsmagazine, a particular ingredient in some rodenticides, known as zinc phosphide, can form a toxic gas when combined with stomach acids or water. The trouble for pet owners and veterinary staff begins when the pet vomits, releasing the newly formed gas phosphine.

Staff members at several veterinary clinics in the U.S. have been sickened as a result of dogs vomiting the rodenticide and releasing phosphine gas. Reported symptoms in people included headaches, shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, dizziness, and nausea.

Other symptoms of phosphine poisoning in both people and animals include vomiting, diarrhea, convulsions, even death.

Phosphine gas may smell like garlic or rotting fish, but it can be dangerous even when no odor is detected at all.

There are steps you can take to protect yourself and your pets:

*Never leave insect or rodent bait where your pets can reach them.
*If you set out bait, keep the portion of the label that lists the ingredients and emergency phone numbers. This information can assist in the treatment of a pet or person exposed to the poison.
*If you believe your pet has ingested the rodenticide, call Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-764-7661 for emergency assistance and instructions.
*Do not give food or liquids to your pet if it has ingested zinc phosphide, since the resulting stomach acids can produce more phosphine gas.
*Do not induce vomiting if you suspect your pet has eaten zinc phosphide. Always wait for instructions from medical personnel.
*Take your pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital. Open the car windows so the vehicle is well-ventilated if the pet throws up in the car.
*If your pet vomits indoors, immediately ventilate the area and leave until you have been given further instructions by a medical professional. If necessary, contact the Fire Department for HAZMAT response, or contact Poison Control (for human exposure) at 1-800-222-1222 for cleanup instructions.
*Phosphine gas is heavy and will sink to the ground. Therefore, stay above the animal’s level, to reduce your exposure.
*If you believe you have been exposed to phosphine gas, seek medical help immediately. 

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The list of rodenticides with zinc phosphide as the main ingredient includes:
Arrex, Denkarin Grains, Gopha-Rid, Phosvin, Pollux, Ridall, Ratol, Rodenticide AG, Zinc-Tox and ZP.

As other products enter the marketplace, this list may change. Always read ingredients and warning labels on rodenticides.

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Resources for this article:
The American Veterinary Medical Association
DVM Newsmagazine, June 2012 
National Pesticide Information Center 

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This post originally appeared on June 15, 2012.

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Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve been talking about what you should do in the event of a pet poisoning emergency. (Click the links to refresh your memory.)

Today, we’ll hit upon a topic that likely has many people confused: if a pet ingests a toxic substance, should the pet be made to vomit in order to rid its body of the toxin?

Here is what the experts at Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance want you to know:

  • If your pet is already showing signs of poisoning, it’s too late to induce vomiting.
  • If your pet has certain medical problems (like laryngeal paralysis or brachycephalic syndrome), inducing vomiting is not recommended and can make your pet’s condition worse.
  • Certain toxins (such as corrosive cleaners and hydrocarbons such as gasoline, paint thinners and kerosene) should NOT be brought back up. Inducing vomiting after the ingestion of these products may ultimately cause more harm than good.

The smartest thing you can do in the event of a suspected poisoning is to call the Pet Poison Helpline (855-764-7661) for advice and then take your pet to the nearest pet emergency hospital.

Est. 1973Coming Thursday:  If your pet throws up this chemical, it can be deadly to people.

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WE WELCOMED:

  • Koffee
  • Sparky
  • Walt
  • Axel
  • Lucy
  • Chip
  • Jane
  • Chico
  • Zoey

WE REMEMBER:

  • Oreo
  • Junior
  • Crystal
  • Oscar
  • Angel

NBG Glory

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