Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2014

Hot on the heels of the recent spate of Hookworm cases, comes Coccidiosis, an intestinal infestation by the parasite coccidia.

Eye-shaped coccidia "egg" called an oocyst.

Eye-shaped coccidia “egg” called an oocyst.

Coccidiae are a protozoan parasite, so they cannot be killed through the worming medications that most pets receive as pups and kittens. Coccidiosis cannot be prevented through heartworm medications, either. For this reason, we always recommend fecal analysis, even for pets that have been wormed previously.

We commonly find coccidiae in pets that have come from a shelter, kennel or “puppy mill,” or pet store. In those situations, multiple animals may be housed together, making the spread of feces-borne parasites more likely. A high level of sanitation is required to prevent transmission of this microscopic parasite, and not all facilities are up to the task. 

Multiple coccidia oocysts clearly visible on the slide. Click to enlarge.

Multiple coccidia oocysts clearly visible on the slide. Click to enlarge.

Coccidiae are also found in the environment, so pets that spend time outdoors may come across objects contaminated with infected feces or consume small animals (such as rodents) infected with coccidiae.

Left untreated, the disease can cause intermittent diarrhea, weight loss, dehydration, and intestinal bleeding. In severe cases, pets may progress to vomiting, depression, refusal to eat, and even death.

When caught early, before severe symptoms appear, Coccidiosis is treated with a multi-week course of medication. Hospitalization may be necessary in more advanced cases, however. Pets can have recurrent cases of Coccidiosis, so vigilance is key.

******************************************************************
This article is not intended to diagnose or direct treatment of any illness or disease. When in doubt, take your pet to the vet!

 All photos by Jennifer Miele at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

We’ve seen a spate of Hookworm cases lately, which afforded me the opportunity to capture the following photos of actual worms, rather than just eggs.
A pup was brought in to see us after vomiting the worms, which is pretty unusual. But what I caught on (digital) film proves the nature of these nasties. Check it out.
(Note: all photos can be enlarged by clicking on them.)

Hookworm eggs in vomitus.

Hookworm eggs in vomitus.

Hookworms A and B on a microscope slide.

Hookworms A and B on a microscope slide.

Hookworm "A" under magnification.

Hookworm A under magnification.

Section of Hookworm A under magnification.

Section of Hookworm A under magnification.

Hookworm A, with a bubble in its mouth, shows off its hooks. They latch onto your pet's intestinal walls.

Hookworm A, with a bubble in its mouth, shows off its hooks. They latch onto your pet’s intestinal walls.

Detail of the guts of Hookworm B.

Detail of the guts of Hookworm B.

Check out the fangs on this guy! Hookworm B looks ready for lunch.

Check out the fangs on this guy! Hookworm B looks ready for lunch.

Tech note: The appearance of the hooks identifies these worms as Ancylostoma caninum.

To learn about Hookworm infection in people, click here.

To learn more about Hookworm in pets, click here.

All photos by Jennifer Miele, at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Read Full Post »

We will soon be trading out Alexandra Whiteside’s photos on our waiting room “art wall” for an original painting by Alexandra.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All but one of the photos are for sale by the artist. (The Fokker DR-7 photo is privately owned by Dr. Miele and is not for sale.)
Please contact us if you have an interest in purchasing an item and we will put you in touch with Alexandra.

Meanwhile, here is a sneak peak at “Fountain,” the new piece we will be exhibiting. “Fountain” was a work in progress when this photo was taken.

A portion of "Fountain," an original painting by Alexandra Whiteside.

A portion of “Fountain,” an original painting by Alexandra Whiteside.

Alexandra is Dr. Miele’s eldest daughter. She has exhibited her photography at the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, Norfolk Botanical Garden, Waterside Festival Marketplace, and Major Hillard Library in Chesapeake. She has most recently exhibited her paintings at the Hampton Roads Convention Center’s Halls of Art and at the Art Institute of Virginia Beach, where she is also an adjunct professor.

 

Read Full Post »

With summer vacation in full swing, pet owners will be taking advantage of the season to go camping, hiking, swimming, and playing in the backyard with their dogs. 

But they’re not the only ones out in force — wild animals will be enjoying the weather, too.  The problem is, wildlife can leave behind a bacterium called Leptospirosis, which infects both people and their pets.

This raccoon may be carrying Leptospirosis - a bacteria dangerous to people and pets.

This raccoon may be carrying Leptospirosis – a bacteria dangerous to people and pets.

LEPTOSPIROSIS PROFILE

Found in:  Water, soil, mud, and food contaminated with animal urine.  Flood water is especially hazardous.  Also found in an infected animal’s tissues and bodily fluids such as blood and urine.

Host animals:  Raccoons, squirrels, opossums, deer, skunks, rodents, livestock, dogs, and rarely in cats.

Points of entry:  Cut or scratch on the skin; mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, mouth; inhaling aerosolized fluids.  Drinking contaminated water; exposure to flood water.

Symptoms in people:  Fever, headache, chills, muscle aches, jaundice, vomiting, rash, anemia, meningitis.  Some people show no symptoms.

Symptoms in pets:  Fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weakness, depression, stiffness, muscle pain.  Some pets show no symptoms.  The disease can be fatal in pets.

When will it show up in my pet:  Between 5-14 days post-exposure, although in some cases it may take up to 30 days.

Gravity:  In people, Lepto infection can lead to kidney and liver failure, and death if left untreated.

Who is at risk:  Campers, water sportsmen, farmers, military, to name a few.

Prevention

  • Vaccinate dogs annually for Leptospirosis
  • Don’t allow dogs to drink from puddles, streams, lakes, or other water that may be contaminated by animal urine
  • Don’t swim in water that may be contaminated by animal urine
  • Wear shoes when outdoors
  • Keep dogs out of children’s play areas
  • Control rodents around your home and yard

Resources: 

http://www.cdc.gov/leptospirosis/index.html  Visit the CDC website for comprehensive information on Leptospirosis in people and pets.

http://www.cdc.gov/leptospirosis/pdf/fact-sheet.pdf  Print your own Lepto fact sheet, or send us a message using the contact form, and we’ll print one for you.

***********************************************************************************
This article was originally posted on July 8, 2011.

Photo credit: D. Gordon E. Robertson, via Wikimedia Commons.

Read Full Post »

[*Not Suitable for Dinner.]

Eating while surfing the ‘net? You may want to cover your eyes for this next part.

We recovered the Tapeworm, shown below, from a patient and, for our amusement, measured the nasty parasite.

Now, most of us see individual Tapeworm proglottids — the short, rice-like segments that exit a pet’s rear-end one at a time. Each of these segments is filled with eggs, which may be consumed by flea larvae once the proglottid is out in the open. The flea matures, hops onto a pet, is then swallowed by a dog or cat during self-grooming, and the whole process begins again.

In this case, it appears that the entire worm has exited the body. (Lord knows why, since all the nutrition it needs is still inside the cat!)

So now, for your edutainment, we present this 10-centimeter Tapeworm, whom we have positively identified through fingerprint analysis** as being the notorious Lonnie Canklespot Gorman, the Third.

Yowza!!!  Photo by Jennifer Miele

Yowza!!!
Click to enlarge. Photo by Jennifer Miele

**Tapeworms do not actually have fingerprints.

If you’ve seen fleas on your pet, he (or she) could also have Tapeworms. While you may not see anything this big, you may see rice-sized or sesame seed-sized segments on your pet’s rear end, poop, or wherever he’s been sitting. If you suspect your pet has Tapeworms, ask your vet for prescription-strength worming medication today.

Read Full Post »

This gloomy rainy evening has got me thinking that we need to add a little color to liven things up. I offer to you these bright, joyful flowers and berries growing in Norfolk’s own Weyanoke Bird and Wildflower Sanctuary.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

***********************************************************************

All photos by Jennifer Miele

 

Read Full Post »

Is this rainy weather getting to your arthritic pet? Perhaps ol’ Sparky needs a little extra help re-building cartilage in his joints. Now is a great time to get your cat or dog started on Dasuquin.* 

Dasuquin 002

Dasuquin is a joint health supplement that uses avocado and soybean ingredients to unify the action of glucosamine and chondroitin, making them work better together for your pet.

Remember: the best time to start a joint supplement program is while cartilage still exists within the joint. All glucosamine/chondroitin supplements require a foundation of cartilage to build on.

Right now, you can receive a $4 rebate on 84 ct. Dasuquin for dogs or cats, when you purchase Dasuquin at our clinic. And each household can receive up to 12 rebates per year.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Get your rebate now!

Need a little nudge? Dasuquin comes with a money-back guarantee, so you can try it out on your pickiest eater!

*Check with your pet’s doctor first. Glucosamine is not recommended for all pets.

 

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »