Drug take back day October 24th

If you have bottles of expired or unwanted medications — whether they were prescribed for people or for pets — do NOT flush them down the toilet. Flushing drugs may contaminate the water system and the environment. But you need to safely dispose of the medications — so what should you do?

Mark your calendar for Saturday, October 24th, the DEA National Prescription Drug Take Back Day (10 AM to 2 PM.)

“The National Prescription Drug Take Back Day addresses a crucial public safety and public health issue. According to the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 9.9 million Americans misused controlled prescription drugs — an increase of 3.9 million people since the 2017 survey.

The study shows that a majority of abused prescription drugs were obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet.
“The DEA’s Take Back Day events provide an opportunity for Americans to prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths,” according to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Find a collection site near you by following this link and scrolling to Collection Site Locator: https://takebackday.dea.gov

On Take Back Day, most collection sites will be at designated police stations.

The Take Back Day website also lists alternate collection sites — including many local pharmacies — if you miss the official Take Back Day.

Don’t let expired drugs end up in the wrong hands — take advantage of Take Back Day!

Does your cat sit and stare at you sometimes? Maybe they are trying to telepathically tell you something of great importance about their health and well-being.

Person high-fiving a grey cat

According to feline health experts, here’s what they may be saying:

  1. The other cat is bullying me and I need my space.

Providing multiple, separate food dishes, feeding areas and litter boxes is one way to reduce aggressive cat-to-cat interactions. Every cat in the household (and you) benefits from separate eating and bathroom areas.

  1. Elevate me.

Cats love high perches so they can easily monitor the space around them. It makes them feel safe and gives them a sense of control over their domain. Build some vertical spaces in your home for your cat. Your cat will thank you!

  1. That lemon-scented plug-in is driving me crazy!

Cats have a keen sense of smell and what we think smells pleasing may be highly irritating to your cat. For example, cats don’t like citrus scents or strong household cleaners, like alcohol or bleach. However, cats do love their own scent and it’s why they rub up against us and the furniture. Do a scent inventory of your house and eliminate smells that may add stress to your cat’s life.

  1. Inside voices, please.

Cats have extraordinary hearing, an adaptation needed as a hunter. They can hear sounds we can’t hear, like the ultrasonic chitchat of mice and rats. So, it’s no wonder that loud sounds can be startling to them.

  1. I want a catio!

If possible, cats should have access to safe, outdoor spaces. Enclosed patios for cats keep them safe from predators, while giving them fresh air and a safe place for bird watching! If a catio is not in your cat’s future, provide them with a room with a view or, if you are adventurous and patient, try leash training them for a safe, outdoor field trip.

  1. Did you know I’m still a predator?

Cat brains are wired to hunt. To keep them from getting bored, provide them with toys that can be pounced on and thrown up in the air to simulate the chase. Also, find ways to play hide and seek with their food, including placing dry food in store-bought feeding balls that mimics hunting. An active cat is a happy cat.

  1. I need a time-out place.

Cats love to hide, especially when they feel threatened. It also gives them a safe and peaceful place to rest outside the hustle and bustle of their human housemates. Give them plenty of hiding options, including boxes, covered carriers or a favorite closet with lots of blankets.

  1. I’ll choose when I want to interact with you.

Always let a cat come to you and signal it wants attention. These signals can be as obvious as jumping in your lap, purring or rubbing up against you. Some cats also are just happy sitting next to you. Cats, just like people, need varying degrees of attention and they’ll let you know how much attention they need to be happy.

  1. I’ve got to scratch.

Most people think cats need to scratch to sharpen their claws. What they are really doing, beside some manicure maintenance, is marking their territory with scent glands in their paws. Provide your cat with scratching posts in areas where they can stretch out and scent away. Cats have different preferences for scratching surfaces so you may need to experiment to find the right fit.

  1. Don’t scold me if I have an accident.

Peeing and pooping outside the box can be a simple matter of the litter box being dirty or using a scented litter your cat didn’t like. But bathroom indiscretions also can indicate a health problem such as kidney disease, diabetes and even arthritis. If accidents become more frequent, it’s time for a cat checkup to make sure there is not an underlying health issue going on.

Providing a comfortable space for your cat, with the resources they need, can dramatically reduce your pet’s anxiety. A more relaxed cat translates into a healthier and well-behaved cat. So, listen to your cat whenever possible. They really are trying to tell you something.

Find out how the Morris Animal Foundation is working every day to improve the lives of dogs, cats, horses, and wildlife around the world.
Click here!


REFERENCES:

Funding a Pressing Need for Feline Behavior Research, Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, April 2020

AAFP and ISFM Feline Environmental Needs Guidelines, Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, February 2013


Photo credit: Snapwire via Pexels

Churches around Hampton Roads are offering pet blessings this weekend in remembrance of St. Francis of Assisi, a great friend to animals. Some locations are collecting items for needy pets, as well. Check this list for a church near you.

Stained glass depiction of St. Francis of Assis

Note: all pets should be leashed or in a carrier. For public gatherings, pet owners should wear their mask.

Pet Blessings on Saturday, October 3rd

Norfolk…Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church…11 AM in the church parking lot.

Virginia Beach…Holy Family Catholic Church…11 AM in the Mary Garden.

Pet Blessings on Sunday, October 4th

Norfolk…Christ the King Catholic Church…12:30 PM on church grounds. Collecting food and toys for Norfolk animal shelters.

Norfolk…Episcopal Church of the Ascension…11:30-12:30 AM “drive-by” blessing. Collecting items for shelter pets; see requested items at the link under “Upcoming Events.”

Norfolk…Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd…5:00 PM in Shirland Forest Lot.

Norfolk…St. Andrews Episcopal…12-2 PM at the Main Street doors.

Portsmouth…Trinity Episcopal Church…4-5 PM. Collecting donations for Portsmouth SPCA.

Virginia Beach…St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church…2:30-3:30 PM in the picnic pavilion.

Virginia Beach…Star of the Sea Catholic Church…10 AM Livestream Mass with virtual pet blessings AND 1:15 PM drive-thru pet blessing.


We have attempted to accurately reflect each church’s information for their event, but be sure to check with your preferred church for accuracy and any last-minute schedule changes, especially in the event of inclement weather.

Did You Know? Your favorite over-the-counter pet products are available through curbside service at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Call 757-583-2619 [or email littlecreekvet@live.com] to place an order — leave a message, if necessary.

We will return your message* to let you know when the item will be ready.

Drive up to our building and we will bring the order out to you and take payment.

*Please note that our current business hours are Monday–Friday 1:30 – 5:00 PM. However, we may be closed on certain days, in order to attend personal appointments. We will strive to return your message as soon as possible within a day.

See the list below this image, for available otc items. Offer is for in-stock items only.

Curbside service available for otc refills

Products available without examination include:

  • Combiva II flea control for small dogs
  • Dasuquin joint supplement tablets
  • Dermal Soothe spray
  • Fly Repellent ointment
  • HomeoPet Anxiety Relief drops
  • HyLyt shampoo
  • Oxyfresh Water Additive
  • PetzLife Oral Care gel
  • Pill crusher
  • Seresto canine flea & tick collars
  • VetriMega Probiotic
  • VetzLife Oral gel

Temporary schedule description

List of symptoms of pain in cats

List of symptoms of pain in dogs

List of common causes of pain in pets

If your pet is exhibiting signs of pain, contact your pet’s veterinarian (or a veterinary emergency practice) and be prepared to discuss the signs of pain, duration of symptoms (how long have you noticed the signs?), and any recent history or information that may help pinpoint the cause of pain. Your pet’s doctor will take it from there.

Keep in mind, your pet’s doctor may arrive at a diagnosis that is not found on the list above!


Disclaimer: Information on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure your pet. Information provided on this site does not take the place of a valid client-patient-doctor relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health. Your pet may require an examination and testing by a licensed veterinarian in order to provide proper diagnosis and treatment. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site. Every pet’s condition is unique and requires the direct care and oversight of its own veterinarian.

Is your pet’s microchip information up-to-date? It’s time to find out!

1 in 3 family pets will get lost…

microchipped pets are more likely to be returned to their homes…

however…

it is estimated that only 6 out of every 10 pet microchip IDs are registered in a searchable database — and some that are registered may contain outdated owner contact information.

A microchip ID is a valuable tool for reuniting lost pets with their families — but only if the chip is registered with current contact information.

You can check your pet’s microchip ID registry status in two ways:

  1. If you know your pet’s microchip ID number, visit www.petmicrochiplookup.org and enter the ID number. If registered, you can then contact the appropriate database [the contact info will be provided] to update your phone number and address.
  2. If you do not know your pet’s microchip ID number, bring your pet to a veterinarian, such as Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, for a free microchip scan. [Most chips can be read by our universal scanner.] Once the microchip ID number has been discovered, you can enter it into www.petmicrochiplookup.org and follow the instructions.

If your pet is not registered in any database, Pet Microchip Lookup will tell you the chip’s manufacturer and contact information so that you can register your pet’s microchip ID right away.

Contact Us to find out how we can scan your pet for a microchip.

Microchip ID statistics


This post originally appeared on August 15, 2019.

Nationwide $500 Amazon giveaway

New pet owners can enter weekly to win one of 7 $500 Amazon.com gift cards good for everything their new BFFs (Best Fur Friends) will need!

Visit www.petinsurance.com/NewBFF and submit a new BFF e-card to enter.

 


Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is associated with this offer; this post is for informational purposes only and does not guarantee that any particular reader will win. For complete contest rules and information, click the link above.

If you feel like fleas are a never-ending problem, it’s because the largest portion of the flea population in your home is in its youth. Over a period of months, these young fleas grow up and head to your pets to eat a meal and to lay new eggs. New groups of fleas are maturing to adulthood all the time — and those are just the ones you see.

Get the flea life cycle timetable here.

On June 23rd, 2012, I scooped some flea eggs and flea feces (aka “flea dirt”, aka baby food for fleas) into a plastic Ziploc bag. Periodically, I checked the bag and photographed the contents as the eggs hatched, larvae squiggled around, and a couple of industrious flea wannabes worked their way toward adulthood.

Check out these photos of the normally unseen world of fleas. 

Flea eggs (on black paper)

Flea eggs on paper; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Flea eggs (magnified; with “flea dirt”)

Magnified flea eggs and flea dirt; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Isolated flea egg (magnified; with “flea dirt”)

Flea egg; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Flea excrement (dried blood from the host animal; also known as “flea dirt”) This will be consumed by flea larvae for fuel

Flea dirt, often the first sign of a flea infestation; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Flea larva (magnified)

Look closely to see the hairs along the larva’s body; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Flea pupa in cocoon [left] and larva [right] (magnified)

Flea pupa safe in its cocoon, with larva and flea dirt; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Immature flea (magnified) This little guy almost made it!

Immature flea, just out of its cocoon; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Treating your dog? We recommend the Seresto 8-month Flea & Tick collar.

Treating your cat? We recommend Revolution.

Tip: Be sure to treat all dogs and cats in the household, plus your home and yard, to have a fighting chance against fleas.


This post originally appeared on July 23, 2012.