Feeds:
Posts
Comments

happyretro-cat-valentine-graphicsfairy

From Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

*****************************************************************

Image courtesy of The Graphics Fairy

Dental disease is the most common disease
in dogs and cats.

Does your pet have it?

It’s time to schedule their yearly check-up,
and find out!

It’s that time of year again. Love, hugs and chocolate are on everyone’s mind. For your pet, the first two come out way on top! (Chocolate is a no-no, but you already knew that!)

Dental disease is the most common disease in dogs and cats, affecting 78% of dogs and 68% of cats over the age of three. Although most dogs and cats will develop some sort of dental disease, small dog breeds, such as Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Dachshunds and Toy Poodles, are more prone to developing periodontal disease than larger breeds.

If your pet has bad breath, it may mean there is a problem with their teeth and gums. This can also contribute to more severe medical conditions. If dental issues are left untreated, you may put your pet at risk for problems in their mouth (periodontitis) or with internal organs (heart disease). The challenge most pet owners face is that even if their pet’s breath smells fine, some dental issues are hard to spot.

Early preventive measures, such as at-home pet dental care and teeth cleanings by a veterinary dentist will help to reduce the frequency and severity of dental disease later in life. The dentist will perform a comprehensive examination of your pet’s teeth and gums. Just like when you visit your dentist, we use special tools to remove tartar from below the gum line and smooth the surface of each tooth to prevent tartar buildup.

Keeping your pet healthy from toe to tooth shows the world how much you love them. The best way to keep your pet in tiptop shape is to schedule your pet’s yearly checkup with us. We’re committed to your pet’s well being every step of the way. (Because we love them too!)

Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

Are you ready to shake off your cabin fever with
a pet-friendly event in Norfolk, VA?
We’ve got the perfect solution —
Norfolk Botanical Garden is opening up to dogs EVERY DAY in February!

fido-fun-month-ad

You can even spend Valentine’s Day with the one you love — your dog! — in Norfolk’s most beautiful natural attraction.

Date and Time:
Dates: February 1 – 28, 2017
9:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Enjoy the Garden all month in February…..ride your bike or bring FIDO for a walk.  Either way, you will enjoy discovering the Garden’s 12 miles of paved pathways – everyday, all month long.

Members: FIDO is FREE (in February), and of course, as a NBG Member, you never pay, during the day,  to come in. (Bring your bike—that’s free too!)

Not Yet Members: Admission for FIDO is just $5.  Bring your your bike – included with your Garden Admission.

FIDO GUIDELINES

  • For the safety of all of our human and furry guests, all dogs must be on a leash.
  • Please remember to bring a few doggie waste bags to pick up after your furry companion. If you forget, we have bags at the tollbooth, front desk, and bag stations in the Garden.
  • Please be mindful of our garden beds. We have 12 miles of paved pathways throughout the Garden for you and FIDO to explore – everywhere except WOW: A Children’s Adventure Garden.

A Warm Welcome:

  • Twinkie
  • Kona
  • Luna
  • Maggie May
  • Snickerdoodle
  • Gracie-Mae
  • Archer
  • Balto
  • Buddy
  • Shy
  • Windy
  • Sunny
  • Storm
  • Nadine

A Fond Farewell:

  • Molly
  • Baby Kitty
  • Sunshine
  • Missy
  • Chester
  • Wally

P1100401

On Tuesday, we learned about the combination of vaccines that make up the canine DHPP booster, commonly referred to as “the distemper shot.” Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that all dogs living in the Hampton Roads region receive their distemper-combo booster, along with the Rabies vaccine. The distemper-combo booster protects dogs against the most common, and deadly, canine diseases.

Cats also receive a cocktail of vaccinations, typically rolled into one shot. Since many cats are allowed to roam outdoors unsupervised, it is especially important to keep cats vaccinated against Rabies and other diseases. This is a closer look at the components of the FVRCCP vaccine, sometimes known as the “feline distemper shot.”

FVR is for Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, aka Feline Herpesvirus-1, a severe upper respiratory disease that, once contracted, often remains in the cat’s body. Recurrent outbreaks throughout the cat’s life are common. Signs include fever, congestion, runny eyes and nose, sores and crusts on the face, lip ulcers, mouth breathing, coughing, sneezing, and drooling. Vaccination helps reduce the severity of signs.

C is for Calicivirus, an upper respiratory disease that can cause fever, blisters on the tongue, and may turn into pneumonia.

C is for Chlamydiosis, a bacterial respiratory infection that is highly contagious. Signs include conjunctivitis, sneezing, runny eyes, excessive drooling, and coughing.

P is for Feline Panleukopenia, aka Feline Distemper, a contagious virus that causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, depression, dehydration, and can lead to death.

Is your cat due or past due to receive its booster vaccinations? Contact Us to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian today!

Note: Other vaccines are available to cats, including Rabies and Feline Leukemia. However, those vaccines are given in a separate injection and, for our purposes, are not considered part of the distemper combinations.

Lg Caduceus

If you’ve ever wondered what all those funky initials stand for in your dog’s annual “distemper shot,” we’ve got the answer for you.

You may see any of the following combinations:

  • DA2PP
  • DHPP
  • DHLPP
  • DHPPC

All of those abbreviations are variants of the distemper-combination vaccine, which may include extra vaccines given according to a pet’s lifestyle.

So what do those letters actually stand for?

D is for Distemper, a highly contagious virus that can cause death in dogs. Distemper affects the respiratory and nervous systems. Signs include coughing, fever, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and seizures.

A2 is for Adenovirus type 2 /
H is for Adenovirus type 1 (aka Hepatitis)
. Adenovirus 2 and Adenovirus 1 are so closely related that a vaccine against one will work against both diseases. Adenovirus 2 is a respiratory illness that causes coughing, retching, and conjunctivitis. Hepatitis affects the liver and leads to fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. In some cases, Hepatitis will damage the kidneys, also.
 

P is for Parainfluenza, a very contagious respiratory disease. Signs include a dry, hacking cough.

P is for Parvovirus, a deadly virus that spreads quickly among dogs. Signs include vomiting, bloody diarrhea, loss of appetite, and lethargy. In some puppies, Parvovirus attacks the heart.

C is for Coronavirus, a severe intestinal disease that often mimics the signs of Parvo and can occur in puppies vaccinated against Parvovirus. Corona also can appear in conjunction with Parvo, worsening the disease symptoms. Signs include vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weight loss, lethargy, and excessive thirst.

L is for Leptospirosis, a bacterial infection spread by wild animals. Dogs often acquire the disease by drinking contaminated water outdoors. Signs include high fever, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), bloody stools, exhaustion, and hemorrhage. If your pet becomes infected with Leptospirosis, you can get sick from it, too.

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that all dogs living in the Hampton Roads region receive their distemper-combo booster, along with the Rabies vaccine. The distemper-combo booster protects dogs against the most common, and deadly, canine diseases.

Is your dog due or past due to receive its booster vaccinations? Contact Us to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian today!

Note: Other vaccines are available to dogs, including Rabies, Bordetella, Canine Influenza, and Lyme Disease. However, those vaccines are given in a separate injection and, for our purposes, are not considered part of the distemper combinations.

Coming up next: Alphabet Soup, Part 2: What’s in your cat’s FVRCP vaccine?

Lg Caduceus

Don’t let your love of baseball be dampened by a disability. Kids [4 and over] and adults with any type of disability are welcome to join the Ocean View Little League Challenger Dodgers & Mets.

[Learn about the Little League Challenger Division here.]

Sign-up cost is $15 per player. Register today! Contact information for Coach Gary Owens is listed on the flyer below:

dsc00178

Play ball!

Did You Know?
What’s the connection between Little Creek Veterinary Clinic and Little League Baseball? Our veterinarian spent his youth in Williamsport, PA, home of the Little League World Series!