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Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will be closed this week
on Saturday, December 16th, for a family event.

Dr. Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian,
will resume regular business hours
on Monday, December 18th.

As usual, our office will be closed on Wednesdays,
and open on Thursday and Friday.

Contact Us to schedule an appointment.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention,
call 757-499-5463.

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WE WELCOMED:

  • Kitty Byrd
  • Pearl
  • Furio
  • Timmy
  • Buttons
  • Madeliene
  • Junior
  • Coco
  • Snowflake
  • Noodle
  • Allie
  • Jackson
  • Charlie
  • Trixie
  • Lilith

WE REMEMBER:

  • Little Girl

Now that Thanksgiving is over, and you’ve finished eating

—  wait — 

you have finished eating, haven’t you?

Good.

We’re going to do some veterinary math.

The picture below illustrates a gaggle of Roundworms.

noodles 1

Roundworms. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic (VA).

How many worms make a gaggle?

Noodles 2

Roundworms. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic (VA).

In this case, seven.

If you feel sick after seeing these pictures,
imagine how your pet would feel if these worms were in its intestines.

The good news:
Roundworms are preventable with a monthly dose of
heartworm / intestinal worm medication,
like HeartGard Plus or Sentinel.

Contact Us to be sure your pet is protected.

 

 

Reminder: Our office will be closed on
Wednesday and Thursday this week.

We will return on Friday, November, 24th.

Emergencies, please call 757-499-5463.

Whether you have a dog that chases cars, jumps up to greet people, or chews on inappropriate objects, pet training consultant Mikkel Becker has dog training videos to help.

Choose from over 20 dog training videos to address your pet’s concerns on Mikkel Becker’s YouTube channel.

According to Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, dogs feel more secure when they know their boundaries and what is expected of them (just like children!) Working breed and sporting breed dogs, especially, build confidence through mastering tasks and skills, but any dog can be trained. A confident dog is a happy dog. Help your pet fit in with the family through basic dog training techniques. 

Veterinary Wellness Exams Lower Overall Pet Costs According to Nationwide Data

One of the costliest aspects of being a pet owner is providing proper veterinary care when medical issues arise. A great way to take a bite out of veterinary expenses without shortchanging your pet’s health is to provide preventive care with annual comprehensive wellness examinations. To show the potential savings that wellness care can provide, Nationwide, the nation’s first and largest provider of pet health insurance, recently sorted through its database of more than 600,000 insured pets to determine cost savings associated with the most common preventive dog and cat conditions. Following is a cost analysis of the five most common ailments that can be avoided through preventive veterinary care:

Dental Diseases:

Examples: Tooth infection or cavity; periodontal disease.

Average cost per pet to treat: $391

Average cost per pet to prevent: $180

Prevention tips: Routine dental care, such as brushing your pet’s teeth, can result in improved overall health. The most effective preventive treatment for dental disease is having your pet’s teeth cleaned by a veterinary professional. This annual cleaning will remove plaque buildup and tartar before it leads to more serious oral issues, such as tooth decay and periodontal disease. It’s recommended that pets have their teeth checked by a veterinarian every six to 12 months.

 

External Parasites:

Examples: Lyme disease transmitted by ticks; and allergic dermatitis caused by fleas.

Average cost per pet to treat: $244

Average cost per pet to prevent: $121

Prevention tips: Use preventive flea and tick medications as recommended by your veterinarian. Keep your pet and home environment free of fleas and ticks. Thoroughly check your pets after outdoor activities and contact your veterinarian if fleas and ticks are spotted.

 

Internal Parasites:

Examples: Heartworms, roundworms, tapeworms and Giardia.

Average cost per pet to treat: $207

Average cost per pet to prevent: $35

Prevention tips: Annual fecal exams and preventive medications, can greatly reduce the chance of a parasitic infestation. Keep your pet and your home environment free of fleas. Clean up your pet’s feces immediately, and eliminate exposure to the feces of other animals when your pet ventures outside your home. 

 

Infectious Diseases:

Examples: Parvovirus, Lyme disease and feline leukemia virus.

Average cost per pet to treat: $841

Average cost per dog to prevent using core vaccines: $94

Average cost per cat to prevent using core vaccines: $81

Prevention tips: Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent contraction of common canine and feline infectious diseases. A vaccination protocol recommended by your veterinarian may include additional vaccines based on your pet’s exposure risk (e.g. outside cat, area with high prevalence of ticks, etc.). 

 

Reproductive Organ Diseases:

Examples: Pyometra (infection of uterus), prostatitis (infection or inflammation of prostate gland) and ovarian neoplasia.

Average cost per pet to treat: $609

Average cost per pet to prevent: $323

Prevention tips: Spay (removal of the ovaries and uterus of a female pet) or neuter (removal of the testicles of a male pet) your pet, as recommended by your veterinarian.

 

Respiratory Infections:

Examples: Tracheobronchitis or kennel cough; feline upper respiratory virus

Average cost per pet to treat: $190

Average cost per dog to prevent: $24

Average cost per cat to prevent: $21

Prevention tips: The Bordatella vaccination as recommended by your veterinarian.

“Seeking a veterinarian’s recommendation for wellness care not only saves pet owners money, but also helps prevent our pets from unnecessary, painful ailments,” said Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and Chief Veterinary Officer for Nationwide. “The cornerstone of good veterinary care has always been catching diseases early. I strongly recommend that pet owners schedule routine wellness examinations with their local veterinarian. Being proactive is in your pet’s best interest.”

Nationwide’s newest and most popular pet health insurance plan, Whole Pet with Wellness®, is the only pet insurance plan in the United States that includes wellness care in its base plan, with coverage for procedures such as spay/neuter, vaccinations, dental cleanings, flea/tick medications, heartworm medication and prescription pet food.*

*Whole Pet with Wellness will cover 90% of eligible veterinary expenses after the annual deductible is met. To learn more about pet health insurance plans and coverage, go to www.petinsurance.com

About Nationwide pet insurance

With more than 600,000 insured pets, pet insurance from Nationwide is the first and largest pet health insurance provider in the United States. Since 1982, Nationwide has helped provide pet owners with peace of mind and is committed to being the trusted choice of America’s pet lovers.

Nationwide plans cover dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets for multiple medical problems and conditions relating to accidents, illnesses and injuries. Medical plans are available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Insurance plans are offered and administered by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company in California and DVM Insurance Agency in all other states. Underwritten by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company (CA), Brea, CA, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2016); National Casualty Company (all other states), Columbus, OH, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2016). Pet owners can find Nationwide pet insurance on Facebook or follow on Twitter. For more information about Nationwide pet insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.